Confusing news today about Clarke Carlisle and let’s not forget the very sad demise of Gary Speed not too long ago.

I say confusing, because Clarke Carlisle is a man who on the face of it, appears to have it all. But of course, depression is not a factor of how things appear. Depression is too often a secret disease and always within.

I have written before about the man who drove me hospital with my very broken leg – having fallen off a scooter. I knew that he had been unwell and that he had struggled with mental health but as he drove me to hospital, he appeared perfectly normal and okay. He was concerned about my well-being and how I was going to manage.  In the emergency room with a surgeon marvelling at my crocked foot, I remember thinking that my driver might have some mental issues but at that point in time, he was in much better health than me. But sadly not because within a year he had taken his life.

I think that the stigma surrounding mental health is receding. But still against people with depression, are people mistaking the normal highs and lows of life with this mental illness.

Whilst we all want to be happy and lead euphoric lives – it is just not realistic. We are meant to be sad at certain times, indeed, we have to be sad if we are going to recognise and enjoy the times when we are happy. So it is okay and normal to have bleak moments. And having these moments don’t make us depressed – just normal.

There is a big difference between this normal ebb and flow of life and someone who has depression which can lead to the ultimate act of finality.

Plus the media types who bleat about having depression to garner sympathy or attention – these people also take away from the very real crisis that afflicts some people.

And if more people understood this – then for the people blighted with real depression like Clarke Carlisle, it will become easier for them to get the treatment they need.