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Hello hello hello…

Our front door bell doesn’t work. Or rather it does work but it goes off all the time – or that local kids are playing knock down ginger on us all day long. Either way, we have unplugged the bloody bell and now rely on a note requesting a heavy knock.

This happened this morning. Early doors, 7am - heavy knocking. A delivery? On a bank holiday. 

I charged downstairs – wondering as I pounded two stairs at a time, how I can make my pyjamas more cool? I can’t go topless these days – so I go for untucked – more casual?

I opened the door to be greeted by two police officers.

Blimey, have I said something on stage that has offended someone?

It turns out that we had left two of our car doors fully open all night. Not one door but two! Bloody kids. I have four kids which means narrowing down culprits will be impossible.

The police officer asks me to check to see if anything valuable has been stolen.

I check the sat-nav but I am not too worried. As it turns out, it is still present out but I am don’t really care. The really valuable thing in my household was not in my car overnight. Because the most valuable thing in my household is my eldest son – and he is safe upstairs asleep.

I shut the car doorS and I thank the officers for their vigilance and concern – and I make a note to myself to find out which kids are to blame. Already, I have narrowed it down to three. The valuable son gets more leeway these days.

Unfair perhaps but so is life…

 

 

“how tom holland eclipsed his dad” by Dominic Holland

A five star book available at Amazon and Smashwords and not available at any good book shops

 

9 thoughts on “Hello hello hello…”

  1. Haha, you should hear our doorbell. Must be the loudest in the world. Luckily it doesn’t ring much with our NO SALESMEN sign.

    1. of course Sophie – and please don’t fret – I joke for a living and that was a joke. I love all my boys equally – which depending on the states of their bedrooms, is variable…

  2. Álvaro Cidoncha

    Hi Dominic
    Firstly, I´m from Spain and I´m 16, so I don´t have a really good English level. First of all, I would like to apologize for the mistakes that I could make while I write.

    Well, I don´t know how to start. I´ve read a lot about you and your son Tom, and also about your wife, and I can only say you´re very lucky. You´ve got a fantastic son who left us without words with his role in “The Impossible”, he was sincerely brilliant.
    I´ve also seen many interviews of Tom about “The Impossible”, and he proves to be a very mature kid, and above all, modest, and this is important. Everyone wants to be famous, but not everyone can control the fame. He is still very young, so he has to have his feet on the floor (I guess you´ll know), but at the same time he has to be “awake”, he has to be “alive”, I don´t know if you know what I mean, because film world is very competitive.
    In this comment, I want to tell you an experience, it happened three years ago. I was in Madrid, I went to a casting for a movie, I knew that it was my opportunity if I wanted to enter the world of film, so I could not lose it.
    I passed a lot of testing, but in the last test I couldn´t control the nerves and I was rejected. It was hard, but I think that happened to me for not being brave and the world is made for brave people.

    So, when I see your son, Tom, he reminds me when I was 13, just with a lot more confidence in him than me.

    So, I hope he continues to be brave, he must take the opportunities that he has and doesn´t waste them, because your son has a gift, and he has to use it.
    Thank you so much.

    1. this is a lovely comment and let me say, that you write very well and you have no need to apologise. And you must not give up either. As I say in my book, Tom has been extraordinarily lucky – albeit he has taken and maximised his chances – and sure the odds of being successful are long – (and I should know) – but the people with absolutely no chance are those who give up – and also never underestimate the power and use of trying as a worthwhile pursuit in itself.

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